House 4: The Repossession

Year: 1992

Synopsis: After the seemingly accidental death of her husband, a woman moves into her late husband’s mysterious old house with her daughter, while dealing with the scheming brother-in-law.

Pros:
• Some genuinely surreal visuals, with a few good scares.
• The dream sequences were well done, all things considered.
• The house itself seemed almost darkly playful, and was quick to learn who its real enemies were.
• The contrast between supernatural madness (the house) and human madness (local organized crime) was an interesting contrast, especially in how the two interacted.

Cons:
• Though “Roger Cobb” returns, the fact that he is really a different character in this film was likely disappointing at best and confusing at worst for fans of the first film.
• Though the plot itself is fairly tight, not much really happens, while it was quite melodramatic.
• A sappy ending, par the course.

Discussion:
Though none ever matched the first, there was some consistency in these supernaturally infested Houses. All of those houses had distinct personalities, either enigmatic or stemming from a specific entity. The first and last had the most distinct personalities of their own, with the last easily the most enigmatic. Repossession presented a house that never seems to like anyone at first, but itself was not necessarily evil. More interesting was how it took such a dislike to the mobster thugs that it destroyed them in shocking and surprising ways. Yeah, it was not a house that liked people, but at least it did what was hopefully right in the long run.


Rotten Tomatoes — N/A

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